5 thoughts on “Rich Guy Buys Political Office — FL, MN

  1. Mike Kennedy says:

    Bruce:

    This guy sounds like a drip, but then again, he is running for political office.

    Your new state of Florida? Come on, Benidt, you cagey liberal. You moved there to avoid state taxes didn’t ya? It’s okay, though. I have clients who do it, but it’s getting tougher.

    This article appeared in a trade pub I read — sounds like you are going to have plenty of company in the sunshine state, my friend.

    http://www.investmentnews.com/article/20100808/REG/308089976

  2. PM says:

    Sorry, Bruce, to change the topic somewhat, but i am really interested in Mike’s take on the following article:

    http://economix.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/08/26/fiscal-austerity-and-americas-future/?pagemode=print

    What do you think?

    I thought that the general point about conservatives not yet really taking realistic positions about the economic situation was a good one, but not the one i am really interested in talking about.

    In stead, what do you think about the question of long term growth of inequality and its possible responsibility for the current economic situation (and crisis)? I tend to be somewhat skeptical of this argument, but….

    1. Mike Kennedy says:

      PM:

      I, like you, am also skeptical of the argument. I think there are a number of reasons for the curent economic situation, but I don’t think inequality is a major reason — haven’t seen any conclusive evidence to believe it.

      http://www.economist.com/blogs/democracyinamerica/2010/08/inequality_and_crash

      This is a pretty good discussion.

      I think we would all be a lot better off if we lived more like my most successful clients who live well below their means. I have real mixed feelings about the whole inequality issue.

  3. Newt says:

    I’m not here to say Scott is a good guy, but I cringe when I read things like this:

    “(he’s) making money now (he needs more) with a chain of for-profit walk-in health clinics, largely used by people without health insurance. He also lobbied to kill health care reform. Neat. Keep more people from being covered, and they come to your clinics. That’s the good ol’ American entrepreneurial spirit.”

    Bruce – what is at the root of your problem with paying directly for the care you receive?

    Are outfits like MinuteClinic really evil?

    Has it occurred to you that healthcare is so profoundly broken because NONE of us actually pays the full cost of the care we get – that we have distant third parties always paying on our behalf?

    1. Newt, good question. In our system, nobody pays for all the care they receive. With insurance, the idea is to spread the cost, share the risk. But insurance has gone off the rails, and I agree part of the problem is insurance masks the true costs of health care.

      I object to an insurance system that leaves out one in ten Americans — the poorest. I don’t think walk-in clinics are bad– they’re a great idea. It’s how we pay for that and any care that’s so unfair. The haves have coverage, the have-nots don’t. And, as you know, we all pay for the lack of care of the poorest Americans.

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