“Hooker lines” aren’t what you might think they are

Over at “for a Better Discourse,” Ike Pigott shares an intriguing article written by a member of the Democratic Party “family” — a speechwriter for John Edwards, Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama — about why she feels “I didn’t leave the Democratic Party; the Democratic Party left me.”

The first of three pages reads a little awkwardly, but overall, it’s worth the time. I was grabbed by her assessment of the Obama campaign’s use (not unique to them, of course) of what she calls “hooker lines,” shallow sound bites good for applause and little else:

I can no longer justify what this party has done and can’t dismiss the treatment of women and working people as just part of the new kind of politics. It’s wrong and someone has to say that. And also say that the Democratic Party’s talking points — that Senator John McCain is just four more years of the same and that he’s President Bush — are now just hooker lines that fit a very effective and perhaps wave-winning political argument…doesn’t mean they’re true.

Just because they’re working, doesn’t mean they’re true. A thought-provoking line. Whether John McCain actually represents “four more years of the same” could be argued till the end of time, but if Obama wins, will that assumption be taken as fact?

Another interesting outtake: If this out-of-work speechwriter disagrees with the Democrats on the financial issues and the Republicans on the social issues, as she hints at in the article, maybe she can find her next job working for the Libertarians!

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